Choose a Real Estate Agent Short Sale

Thus, short sales will be less of an anomaly and more the norm, sellers have a lot more work on their hands than simply getting their home listed. Needless to say, not just any real estate agent you want a realtor who knows the market of selling and preferably have closed some success. But what makes a good agent different from the bad? Here are some questions you should ask to see if a real estate agent for you.

Do you work full time?

Many agents keep your day job and only in the area of ​​real game in real time. It is perfectly legal, but does not guarantee the best service. A full time officer has more time to do market research, establish professional relationships, and to keep abreast of market trends. He also says it is not only in the sector to tap the market today.

Are you qualified to do short sales?

A representative may say they can do a short sale, but can not be qualified. National Association of Realtors has launched a training program for certifying agents short sale, so be sure that the agent has taken. They do not need to specialize in one or foreclosures short sales, but they need enough experience to know what they are doing.

How many short sales are you reading?

You want someone who has made a lot of short positions, but you do not want them to have their hands full either. A real estate agent working full time might be able to handle more than five offers at once, but the more they have the less time they will be able to devote to each. Make sure your card sales agent cannot afford the time of your short sale deserve.

Do you do with other professionals?

Some sales companies partnered with other experts, such as real estate lawyers and accountants who may provide additional services such as negotiation with lenders and tax advice. Try to find agents who belong to a professional team or have ties to the field. They may cost more, but it’s cheaper to hire separately.

Do you charge fees upfront?

Never agree to pay all fees before your agent can give real results. Most state laws have prohibited the payment, because the sellers are vulnerable to fraud. Brokerage fees, processing and closing are paid by the bank in a short sale, if a seller has no reason to pass these costs to you.”


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